#BookReview: SEEING RED by Sandra Brown

#1 New York Times bestselling author Sandra Brown delivers nonstop suspense and supercharged sexual tension in a thriller about tainted heroism and vengeance without mercy. 

Kerra Bailey is a TV journalist hot on the trail of a story guaranteed to skyrocket her career to new heights. Twenty-five years ago, Major Franklin Trapper became a national icon when he was photographed leading a handful of survivors to safety after the bombing of a Dallas hotel. For years, he gave frequent speeches and interviews but then suddenly dropped out of the public eye, shunning all media. Now Kerra is willing to use any means necessary to get an exclusive with the Major–even if she has to secure an introduction from his estranged son, former ATF agent John Trapper.

Still seething over his break with both the ATF and his father, Trapper wants no association with the bombing or the Major. Yet Kerra’s hints that there’s more to the story rouse Trapper’s interest despite himself. And when the interview goes catastrophically awry–with unknown assailants targeting not only the Major, but also Kerra–Trapper realizes he needs her under wraps if he’s going to track down the gunmen . . . and finally discover who was responsible for the Dallas bombing.

Kerra is wary of a man so charming one moment and dangerous the next, and she knows Trapper is withholding evidence from his ATF investigation into the bombing. But having no one else to trust and enemies lurking closer than they know, Kerra and Trapper join forces to expose a sinuous network of lies and conspiracy–and uncover who would want a national hero dead.

Release Date: August 15, 2017

Amazon

 

My Review

Sandra Brown has justifiably earned her place as one of the top romantic suspense authors. Seeing Red gives us a scorching physical attraction between Kerra and Trapper, while keeping us on edge as past and present intertwine and secrets unravel.

That being said, and get ready to boo me, this was not one of her best books. And of course that’s subjective. Brown’s storytelling is, as always, remarkable. I could see the characters and feel their emotions. But I wasn’t invested in the story as I normally would be.

His eyes scaled downward from her messy topknot all the way down to her fuzzy slippers, taking in the flannel pajamas in between.

Some of the word choices felt dated and/or strange for the specific characters. For instance, every single character referred to the bathroom as the “powder room”. Maybe it’s a regional thing, but I’ve never heard anyone under 70 use that term. It seemed particularly odd coming from cops and a rugged man in his thirties. Also, criminals who broke into a certain place were referred to as “intruders”. Again, maybe it’s a regional thing, but no one I know would tell me they had “intruders” in their home.

Had he seen her go into the powder room?

Another problem area for me came with the lack of romance and abundance of sex. Quite a bit of and quite graphic sex, in fact. I missed the softness of the relationship. The characters’ actions and dialogue felt more like edgy erotica than romance.

“Could I impose on you to do that thing with your thumb again?”

The pace is steady, and the plot takes us to some interesting places with a couple interesting twists. But the reasoning behind it all, for me, felt weak. I can’t explain why without giving spoilers.

Despite my complaining, the story held my interest and I enjoyed spending time with the characters. And, as I said, my complaints are specific to me. If you’re in the mood for steamy suspense, give this one a try.

*I was provided with an advance ebook copy by the publisher, via NetGalley, in exchange for my honest review.*

 

Thanks for reading. 🙂